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Chris Fagan & old outsider coaches

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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:56 am
Post subject: Chris Fagan & old outsider coachesReply with quote

J. Niall:

Searching for the next Chris Fagan

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/searching-for-the-next-chris-fagan-20190719-p528xh.html

"By 2016, he was an age (55) when most coaches were winding up or done. He had never played at AFL level and did not present as the kind of domineering alpha male that clubs often favoured. And, after six years as "director of coaching" at the Hawks, he'd been an administrator since 2013.
...

Today ... Chris Fagan is viewed as a new model for a senior coach, having shifted perceptions about what matters in coaching and the ideal background for a senior coach.
...

If we look beyond the blinkered, insular universe of AFL clubs, Fagan's life story and resume is far closer to the elite coaches in Europe and the United States, where experience in coaching, people management skills and teaching prowess – plus tertiary qualifications – trump whatever the coach did as an athlete/player.
...

In 2014, an academic from the University of Queensland, Dr Steven Rynne, conducted a research project that sought to create a profile of an elite coach in international sports. Dr Rynne used 14 well-known coaches across elite sports – five team sports and nine individual sports.
...

The identikit of these elite coaches is closer to a match with Fagan than virtually any other current AFL coach. Most significantly, the average age of the super 14 was 55, ranging in age from 44 to 67.

Their average years coaching was 29, with more than 25 of those years spent coaching at the top level. The difference with Fagan is that he's been involved at the highest level for 22 years but not as head coach.

All bar one of the 14 had tertiary qualifications – as Fagan, who came to footy in Tasmania as a teacher, does. All 14 were married men, 13 had children.
...

Overall, Dr Rynne found these coaches high in conscientiousness and extraversion and low in neuroticism. As low scorers in neuroticism, they worried little about those underneath posing a threat.

The study summed up their key personalities traits thus: "Diligent and disciplined, emotionally stable and secure, quite sociable and enjoy challenges."

Dr Rynne also told Brayshaw back in 2014 that these coaches "are not easily upset" and scored high on optimism.

They liked to empower athletes and delegate to assistants underneath. They had, as Rynne wrote, "a clear vision that each wants and needs to be done in this regard – accompanied by a will and zeal to work and focus hard to reach set targets".
...

The success of a 58-year-old first-time senior AFL coach, who never played at the level, with a teaching background, exceptional people skills and vast managerial experience, would suggest, perhaps, that the AFL clubs – forever striving to emulate Manchester United, Real Madrid, the New England Patriots and Olympic sports – have finally cottoned on to what these organisations look for in a coach."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2019 3:09 pm
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How AFL clubs pick coaches: The hidden process

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/how-afl-clubs-pick-coaches-the-hidden-process-20190726-p52b7z.html

"Many on the selection panel have never sat in a coach’s box...

An ex-player will also have his own set of beliefs, generally forged during a successful career, but often in another era.

An outsider may have the expertise but lack accountability or influence, one reason former coaches are often reluctant to become involved.

One suggestion made was that those selecting should undergo the next coach program while a media expert on a panel would also be useful given the vital role a coach plays in representing the club.

That appears too radical a step for most clubs to take right now although St Kilda has taken the unprecedented step of appointing an AFL employee - coaching educator David Rath - to their panel.
...

One club estimated they spent at least 15 hours with their preferred candidate during the selection process prodding and poking him from all sorts of angles before they were convinced he was the one.

Another club began with 200 names, whittled that group to 80, then 20 then three or four before two became one.

Brisbane Lions coach Chris Fagan’s path to appointment began with an informal coffee then he made a presentation, followed by a question and answer session and then live coaching for about a quarter before the Lions settled on him.

Port Adelaide assessed candidates on technical capacity, management skills and their ability to create and drive a strong culture.

All that rigmarole followed what has become the most important part of the coaching selection process: before they began assessing candidates, clubs needed to understand where they sat and what they needed by looking inwards rather than outwards.

Misread that situation or fail to do the requisite work to know what is required and the odds of making a successful coaching appointment lengthen.

When the Melbourne board thought they needed a hard-edged coach and appointed Mark Neeld, they misread what the players at that time really needed, which was a softer touch. ...
...

Little process appears to have occurred before Mick Malthouse, Ross Lyon, Leigh Matthews, Malcolm Blight and Paul Roos landed at clubs as Messiah appointments and the decisions enjoyed varying degrees of success.

Going the Messiah route may appear to mitigate the risk, but not the cost, but there are still those willing to head down that path."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2019 2:11 am
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Bob Murphy:

Roos acted on what they could see, but will the Blues?

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/roos-acted-on-what-they-could-see-but-will-the-blues-20190807-p52es8.html#comments

"In the past couple of weeks, I've begun to wonder if we are witnessing the death of footy's "due diligence".
...

I'd started to think there are in fact two types of duediligence: one conceived out of intellect, detail and thoroughness, and the mutated football definition, born of a fear of failure or embarrassment. To my delight, I found there were two variations.

Due diligence (1): A comprehensive appraisal of a business undertaken by a prospective buyer, especially to establish its assets and liabilities and evaluate its commercial potential.

Due diligence (2): Reasonable steps taken by a person to avoid committing a tort or offence.

I believe the game changed when North Melbourne appointed Rhyce Shaw as their senior coach. The Kangaroos have backed their judgment and what they have been able to see, hear and touch in the two months since Shaw became their caretaker coach.
...

The noise out of North Melbourne was that Shaw had brought the team together, but just as importantly brought the club together, too. I haven't seen or heard that coming from the Blues' camp. Is that the reason why Teague could miss out? Is it possible that the "training wheels" comment from board level is the set-in-stone directive? Teague may never have been in the running if that's the case, but could that have changed too?

Are the Blues going to drift towards Due Diligence Version Two? Where a large motivating factor is to already be preparing for the scary thought that it might not work out, and you need to be able to stand behind the process if it all goes belly up in three years' time?

Picking coaches is incredibly important, but if you're not positive and bold as you set sail, you might be shot already."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2019 10:47 pm
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J. Niall:

Teague train gathers steam as people power comes to Carlton

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/teague-train-gathers-steam-as-people-power-comes-to-carlton-20190810-p52fuq.html

"Unlike North Melbourne, which called off their search and installed Rhyce Shaw with several games left, the Blues – wisely – have left the decision until their season is done, giving themselves time to consider other options and to make a sober decision with as much information as possible.

Teague has presided over significant changes in game style, positions of key players (eg Marc Murphy and Ed Curnow back to the midfield), team psychology and management of coaches (giving the assistants their heads).

But, should he win the job for next year, the most momentous change on his watch will arguably be the unleashing of a new populism at Carlton, never a club with democratic impulses.

The Blues have always been top-down, not a bottom-up club. ...

"There'll be upheaval if he doesn't get it,'' said one well-connected Carlton figure with a knowledge of the club's workings.
...

Another factor that has given impetus to the Teague train is the unity within the club that has become evident since he took over, including players, staff and hangers-on. The Blues, often subject to factionalism – most notably between those loyal to Elliott and those against him – appear to have as much common purpose as they've seen since the salary cap scandal of 2002 and draconian draft penalties turned cracks into canyons.

Most of all, though, there's one cultural factor that applies to all clubs, but is particularly acute at Carlton and which has allowed the Teague train to run ahead of the club's timetable: winning."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2019 5:02 pm
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J. Niall:

How Teague got the full-time job at Carlton

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/how-teague-got-the-full-time-job-at-carlton-20190815-p52hgq.html

"Carlton's coronation of David Teague as senior coach was based upon an elaborate process that involved building a personality profile of Teague and other candidates and matching it against the make-up of the Carlton playing group.

The Blues would subsequently describe Teague as "a perfect match" for their players - unwittingly using the language of online dating. Each of the players filled out an online questionnaire as part of the club's profiling of their collective and individual traits.
...

The chief executive Liddle was at pains to say that the process had been thorough, including not simply the profiling, but the interviews, close-up observations of Teague and the use of a data analyst."



[Of course Teague can't really be called an outsider, but he's not the typical Carlton choice, and many thought Judd's "training wheels" comments ruled him out.]
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:02 pm
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J. Niall:

The rise of caretakers will bring more coach trials ... and sackings

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/the-rise-of-caretakers-will-bring-more-coach-trials-and-sackings-20190817-p52i4m.html

"So, Malcolm Gladwell's assessment of teachers – that you never how they'll go until they begin the job – applies to coaches in the AFL, with this further complication: a coach's success at one club doesn't predict success at another.

Hiring a premiership coach on $1.5 million doesn't guarantee a leap up to contention. As with Pagan and Malthouse, he might not fit the particular circumstances at that club at that specific period.

A rigorous process of interviewing and assessing the chosen assistant coaches (typically from Hawthorn or another winning team) doesn't necessarily deliver either.
...

So, the rise of the caretakers is also the rise of the coaching trial. Carlton and North opted for coaches who'd been tested internally over several weeks; it is much easier to assess a coach on the job than make educated guesses about external candidates.

In recent years, the concept of sacking coaches mid-season has been frowned upon. ...

But the caretaker coach has created another model of the coaching trial, which other clubs will surely follow in the next couple of years. It's a logical step, in some ways. The AFL has decided to trial rules before their introduction; why shouldn't clubs do the same with the most difficult routine decision they face of choosing a senior coach?
...

Trialling an assistant mid-season is appealing when, (a) the season's basically shot, (b) the assistant is clearly capable, (c) you don't want to spend too much on the next coach (especially if the senior coach has been paid out) and (d) the other candidates aren't terribly appealing.
...

We should be ready, therefore, for further sackings mid-year, which may or may not be justified. But if Teague and Shaw fail over the next three years, the caretakers fashion will be jettisoned as quickly as the coaches themselves."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 2:28 pm
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No coincidence: The traits that make the NRL's coaching kingpins a cut above

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/no-coincidence-the-traits-that-make-the-nrl-s-coaching-kingpins-a-cut-above-20190918-p52sp7.html

"Perhaps it is no surprise, then, that the teams left standing in the NRL season are run by coaches that all bring something a little left of centre to the round table.
...

All of them tend to share some similarities, though, no matter how wildy different they are in and around their clubs and away from the field. ...

Intensity
...

New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman remembers walking out of the training facility at 11pm one night happy with all the extras he'd just completed ... only to see coach Bill Bellichick pounding the treadmill watching game footage. That latent intensity breeds respect and performance.
...

Paranoia
...

One line in a news report by one reporter at one organisation can turn into an over-arching, concerted effort to bring down the club. Bennett has done it superbly over the years and Stuart and Hasler are masters of the age-old seige mentality, where every man and his dog are out to get them. Playing groups respond time and time again.

The element of surprise
...

While the best coaches leave almost nothing to chance along the course of a season, they have a habit of keeping things fresh and occasionally unpredictable within the walls of a club and even when projecting to the outside world."



[Don't know about that... Maybe when successful coaches are like that, they are praised for it. When unsuccessful coaches are like that (e.g. Richo), the media say they are "too intense", "paranoid", etc.]
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:26 pm
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The good, the bad and the ugly of AFL succession plans

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-of-afl-succession-plans-20190920-p52tdx.html
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:36 pm
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Suns sound out Neil Craig for support coaching role

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/suns-sound-out-neil-craig-for-support-coaching-role-20191124-p53dmg.html

"The Suns are open to finding ways to beef up support for Dew and their coaches as demands continue to grow. Gold Coast's situation is particularly difficult given their need to nurture young talent while attempting to remain competitive.

Craig, who was a star player in the SANFL, worked with Olympic Cycling and was involved in the Crows 97-98 premiership teams as a fitness adviser before becoming their senior coach in 2004. He led Adelaide to consecutive preliminary finals in his first two seasons, which they lost by less than three goals on each occasion.

After finishing up at the Crows the 62-year-old worked as a director of coaching at Melbourne alongside Mark Neeld, before stints at Essendon as high performance manager and Carlton, where he worked well with former senior coach Brendon Bolton.

He is regarded as one of the best and most experienced coaching educators in the country and has strong credentials to support any club as they develop ways to support the increasingly-demanding senior coaching role."
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:04 pm
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Craig joins Gold Coast as part-time consultant

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/craig-joins-gold-coast-as-part-time-consultant-20191203-p53gjx.html

' "Neil will have a very specific scope of responsibility and work closely with Stuey and the coaching group on how they collaborate, reflect and teach," Suns football general manager Jon Haines said.

Craig will remain involved with the England rugby union team...

"My role will be to observe, to listen and pose questions and offer my observations to Stuey and the coaching group, based on my experiences." '
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:41 am
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M. Gleeson:

North's team of P-Platers

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/north-s-team-of-p-platers-20191204-p53gul.html

"AFL football has not seen change like it. In the space of six months every single leadership position at North Melbourne bar the chairman has changed.

North has a new chief executive, general manager of football, list manager and a senior coach appointed mid-season. While all the appointments have experience, none have experience in the positions they are now in.
...

None of these appointments in isolation would be remarkable but the fact of so many leadership positions being held at once by people without direct experience in those roles is surprising."
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